I'm Bored!

 The holidays are here, and all you hear is, ‘Mum, Dad, I’m bored.’

It is very easy to fall into the trap of feeling as though you need to try to think of solutions or become ‘the entertainment’ for your children when you inadvertently hear the dreaded phrase, ‘I’m bored’ or worse, experience what they actually start getting up to when boredom sets in, the fights, the mess, the frustration. Following are some ideas to help you with your bored children that are designed to stop you getting sucked into coming up with endless ideas, or spending buckets of cash keeping them entertained.


1. Computers, video games and T.V are great, they can be educational and can teach hand-eye co-ordination, but there is a down side. They are actually passive activities that limit creativity. Have you noticed your children will misbehave straight after they finish watching TV or playing on the computer? This is often because their brains are having trouble transitioning from passive to active. They might not be bored; their brain just needs a re-boot. Get your children into the routine of jumping on the trampoline, running around the yard, doing star jumps etc for a few minutes after a passive activity. They will be more likely to be able to think of something to do themselves then.

2. In the mornings or at the beginning of each week, brainstorm activities together that they can do when they are bored. Get them to write a list or draw pictures illustrating the ideas. When they come to you to say they are bored, get them to check the list and choose something from there.


3. Listen, and acknowledge that you have heard what they are saying, without trying to fix it for them. Say, ‘I’m sorry that you are bored. Let me know what you come up with to do.’ Or ‘ I understand that, I feel bored sometimes myself.

4. Give them choices, such as, ‘You can continue to be bored or find something to do.’

5. Say that you would be very happy to show them how to vacuum, clean the car, wipe the ledges etc. Maybe they will want to, or maybe they will get as far away as possible and find something much more attractive to do.

6. Be realistic, nobody is suggesting that children should be left to their own devices the entire holidays, have a routine, one that balances:

* Time for household jobs
* Time for spending with you when you need to get things done, such as grocery shopping
* Time for playing together (spending quality time)
* Time for organized activities/ time with friends that they can become engaged in
* Time to be independent (but not Bored!).

 


Author: Meg Parkinson
info@thriveparenting.com.au